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Learning outside the Classroom in Rural Senegal

Guest Blogger: David Silberberg, Program Assistant at the Illinois Study Abroad Office

Study abroad is an opportunity not only to learn in foreign institutions, but also to learn outside the classroom. Taking a step outside your comfort zone into a place unlike anywhere you have been can be a learning experience that cannot be replicated in any school, at home or abroad. When I studied and interned in Senegal for a semester, I realized that while my classes were certainly great, what made the experience invaluable was the time I spent in places that where far different from anything I was accustomed to in the US. The most profound of these experiences was the time I spent with my internship or host family in rural areas–villages that often lacked electricity or running water and usually had no more than a few hundred residents. Coming from suburban Los Angeles and the University of Illinois, this was something I had never encountered. Even for many Senegalese people, this lifestyle is foreign. The World Bank estimates that 43% of the population is urban, with that number becoming larger each year.

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One of the many villages in the area north of the Saloum Delta

For Americans, hearing or seeing pictures of these villages may evoke feelings of disbelief or pity. For some, this is the quintessential image of sub-Saharan poverty–the small village with simple huts and no utilities. However, being able to visit some of these villages and those who live there reveals a far different reality, showing that these conceptions are deeply misguided.

Village life for many is a exactly as they would like it. Everyone works together: farming, raising animals, building houses, taking care of children. Everyone knows their neighbors, and lives are free of the distractions that have come to define our lifestyles. Without television, cell phones, lights to keep us awake all night, car exhaust, noise, and more, life becomes much simpler, but also much more relaxing and, for many, more rewarding.

Who wouldn’t like to spend a while hanging out under that tree?

Several of my host family’s relatives would live in town to go to school and then return to the villages whenever they had a break. My host father would often go spend time (sometimes taking me along) in the village where he was born and where his mother and brother still live. My host brothers often talked about how after they worked in the city and made enough money, they would like to retire and live in a village.

This is not to say that rural life is better than city life. Of course, there are many challenges and issues facing those who live in villages. But what makes life in villages enjoyable is the lack of the things that we cannot imagine living without in our daily lives–TVs, cars, smartphones, computers, etc. Even more, however, is the lack of rent, boring corporate office jobs, mortgages, loans, debt, bills, and the list goes on forever. To sum it all up in one word, rural life is relaxing. Which is something that I think everyone could appreciate, even if it means no iPhones.

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passing through a village on a hot day

Studying Abroad: Debunking the Myths

Guest Blogger: Cristina Valdez, Program Assistant at the Illinois Study Abroad Office

Throughout my time at the University of Illinois, I have encountered a few well-known rumors that relate to the study abroad process. I have heard people often say, “Well, studying abroad is just too expensive,” or the ever-popular, “Study abroad is a blow-off semester,”  and my personal favorite, “I just don’t have time to study abroad.” Those that believe these fallacies do not know of the multitude of resources regarding study abroad that are offered on the Illinois campus. Now, it’s time to shed some light on these topics and put these rumors to rest. I’m here to debunk these popular myths and reassure you that not only is study abroad a unique experience, but also a worthwhile and fruitful investment for your life and your future.

Myth #1: Studying Abroad Is Too Expensive 

It’s no secret that attending a four-year university is an expensive period in a person’s life. Tuition costs are on the rise, and many of us get buried under the pile of student loans after graduation, however studying abroad doesn’t add to this cost — it can actually reduce it. That’s right! Studying abroad can actually SAVE you tuition money. Who would have thought? The Illinois Study Abroad Office offers a myriad of programs that are either comparable or less than a semester or year’s tuition at U of I and similar in academic standards. During my study abroad semester in Uppsala, Sweden, I saved my parents $15,000 in the six months that I was there. These savings were not due to the fact that I was “living frugally,”  because trust me, I went all out, but they were simply because I had found a suitable program for my budget. Overall, my study abroad experience was less than $8,000. You too, can save this much while studying abroad. In addition, not only does the Study Abroad Office offer low-cost programs but they award more than $850,000 in scholarships every year. One in four students gets the I4I scholarship to study abroad. What if you receive financial aid? No problem! in most cases, your financial aid can cover the costs of your study abroad experience. To find out more, visit the financial aid office to discuss, stop by the Resource Room (112 International Studies Building) to get a list of our low-cost program options and to find out about scholarships and financial aid click here.

Myth #2: Studying Abroad Is Just A Blow-Off Semester 

Exciting adventures? Check. Exposure to a different and exciting culture? Check. Major/minor, gen-ed credit? Check. The study abroad programs that the University of Illinois offers have not only been vetted by an academic committee for rigor, but offer courses across all majors and academic disciplines. So not only can you take courses in your major for academic credit, but also electives and general education requirements. Some of the programs are so convenient, that I have known friends and acquaintances who have taken courses abroad and finished an entire minor! There are an array of opportunities which allow you the academic freedom to take the courses that suit your needs. Academics are the most important part of STUDYing abroad, so take advantage of the opportunities offered. Interested in seeing what other students have taken and the type of Illinois credit they’ve received? Check out our Course Approval Database here for more information.

Myth #3: I Don’t Have Time To Study Abroad 

The most popular myth by far, is that of not having enough time to engage in a study abroad experience. As students, we are all busy. From studying for classes, preparing for future careers or internships, working and staying involved on campus some may think that time to go abroad is nonexistent. However, when considering studying abroad, it’s important to note that there are specific programs that can fit your tight schedule. Whether your schedule is extremely constricted, such as that of education majors, or if you have strict on-campus course requirements, there are still opportunities out there for you! The study abroad office offers programs with varying lengths of time. From our Faculty-Led Winter Break and Summer Break options (2-4 weeks), to regular summer programs (4-6 weeks), fall and spring semester options, and academic year programs, rest assured that you can fit studying abroad into your college curriculum. All of these programs offer enriching experiences to help you discover a whole new world (literally!).

So, before you write off studying abroad as an experience you can’t afford, an experience you will not receive academic credit for, or as an experience you won’t have time for, come speak to one of our Program Assistants at the Resource Room (112 International Studies Building). Not only are PAs equipped to provide you with all of the information regarding study abroad programs but also in assisting you in during your search to find one that will most adequately fit your needs. Consider the benefits that studying abroad can offer you! An experience like this is one which you will not find after exiting academia, so take advantage of the future doors it may open and the people you could meet while exploring a new culture or learning a new language. Remember, Illini Go Places! Visit studyabroad.illinois.edu for more information.

Explore The World Like No One Is Watching

Travel Stock PHOTO

Guest Blogger: Alicia Daniels, Program Assistant at the Illinois Study Abroad Office 

“We should come home from adventures, perils, and discoveries every day with new experience and character.” –Henry David Thoreau

Before I stepped a toe into any airport to fly solo to the United Kingdom, I spent months combing over blogs, government sites, and even Pinterest – I’m ashamed to reveal that last source – in failed attempts to piece together clues about what my study abroad experience may look like. Although I have lived in several countries in Europe before I never visited the city my program was being held. I was finally bursting out of the “campus-life” bubble and, even though that feeling was invigorating, the idea of not being around familiar surroundings was terrifying!

However…I made it sixth months “across the pond” and returned home –for the most part- unscathed (sorry for those impromptu ear piercings in France, Mom and Dad)! The most rewarding moments I had abroad were the times that I traveled off the beaten path and explored the cities I was so fortunate enough to be in. Here are three tips that helped me make the most of my time outside of the classroom:

Talk to the locals. “But what if they realize I’m a foreigner?” Well you are, so embrace it! Don’t worry if you think a native will judge you; chances are they will find you to be a novelty and will want to know more about you too. Plus, you may even pick up a few new friends along the way. Locals are a great resource to understand a city’s public transportation system, the best eateries, and the coolest places to blow off steam after long nights of studying.

Istanbul Coffee Shop Stock Photo

Don’t be afraid to look like a tourist. Grab a map, your camera, and just go! Your study abroad program will go by much quicker than you think. Before school starts and things really pick up try to map out some tourist locations you would love to visit around town. You may think you’ll have 4-6 months to see it all but between finals, making friends, and traveling you may miss out on some hidden gems located in the city of your host university.Huff Post Stock Image - Blog Post

Travel light on the weekends. If you study in Europe, you’ll soon find out that historic towns with cobblestone streets – although completely gorgeous – are not great for rolling around luggage. If you are taking weekend trips to a neighboring city try limiting yourself to a backpack. You really only need the essentials and it will be much easier to carry if you have to wait for a train or need to pass time outdoors until your hostel room is ready.The Abroad Guide Stock Photo - Blog Post

Fear of the unknown is absolutely normal but don’t let that deter you from exploring something new! Let’s be honest, you’re most likely going to get lost at one point during your journey but you’re also going to come back with memorable experiences and tons of pictures that will make all of your Instagram followers terribly jealous.

Summer Sweet: Sticky Toffee Pudding

Sticky Toffee Pudding

In the last of our Summer Recipes series, we steal this delicious recipe from Rahul Panchal’s blog:

Who knew that Jamie Oliver, better known for his nutritional revolutions and healthy cooking movement, would have such a devilishly indulgent recipe up his sleeve? Then again, being British, it would be a shame for him not to have a good recipe for sticky toffee pudding. Addicting to the core, my friend gobbled down three helpings of this stuff in one sitting! With that said, let’s quickly run through the basics and get to this recipe! I guarantee that you that the tray will be wiped clean before you can even swing by for seconds!

In England, pudding is a generic term given to describe many things dessert-like, not just the custardy stuff that most people are used to. Therefore, sticky toffee pudding is essentially a quick-baking cake made primarily of dried dates. Even though they are madly delicious on their own, dried dates add sweetness, bulk, and such a wonderful moistness to this pudding that you’ll be questioning why you don’t have a date farm in your backyard. Cinnamon adds a characteristic flavor that makes this reminiscent of a spice cake, while ovaltine adds a slight malty note in the background.

After the pudding (or cake if you are looking for a more American description) is baked, it is soaked in a wicked awesome toffee sauce, hence the name sticky toffee pudding. The sauce is also superbly easy to make. It’s a simple reduction of cream, butter, and brown sugar. Even though the recipe asks for unsalted butter, I actually went ahead and used salted butter, and believe me, it was probably one of the best decisions that I had made in a while. Using salted butter allows you to offset the sweetness from the sugar, which sometimes can be cloying, especially if you plan on consuming it in liberal amounts (as you must do with this recipe). It also doesn’t hurt to mention that Denmark happens to have some of the best butter in the world, so naturally I try to use it whenever I get the chance! However, regardless of where you live, and whether or not you actually like to bake, please, please, please give this recipe a try! It will have addicted to this new realm of quick-cooking deserts in a heartbeat. In fact, I’ve already made this twice!

Recipe: Sticky Toffee Pudding

Adapted Slightly from Jamie Oliver

Ingredients

  • 225 grams fresh or dried dates, pitted
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 85 grams salted butter, softened
  • 170 grams sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 170 grams all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons ovaltine powder
  • 2 tablespoons yogurt

For the Toffee Sauce:

  • 115 grams salted butter
  • 115 grams light or dark brown sugar
  • 140 ml heavy cream

Method

1. In a medium-sized bowl, cover the dates with about 1 cup of boiling water. Allow the dates to soak for a couple of minutes and then drain. Puree the dates in a food processor or blender until they are smooth.

2. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius/ 350 degrees Fahrenheit. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar with a wooden spoon until the mixture is pale in color. Then add the eggs, flour, ovaltine, cinnamon, and baking soda. Mix the batter together until everything is well incorporated. Then fold in the pureed dates and the yogurt. Pour the batter into a greased, ovenproof dish and bake for about 35 minutes, ’til a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.

3. While the pudding is baking, make the toffee sauce. Combine the butter, brown sugar, and heavy cream in a small saucepan, and heat the mixture over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the mixture has thickened, reduced, and darkened to a rich brown color.

4. Serve the pudding hot out of the oven scooped out into plates with a generous pouring of the hot toffee sauce. No ice cream or whipped cream is needed. Just the pure pudding, toffee sauce, a spoon, and a happy person to eat it. Enjoy!

Choosing a Program: Finding and Creating a Home

Guest Blogger: Amanda Toledo

On the cover of a journal my mom bought me, there’s a George Bernard Shaw quote that reads “Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about Creating yourself.” Cheesy as inspirational-quote journals may be, I like the sentiment, although I think that life is more a mixture of both seeking and creating. Deciding which study abroad program to go on is no less challenging for some than deciding which university to go to or what to major in. Many students enter the Resource Room knowing they want to go abroad but not knowing where in the world they’d like to go. Program Assistants work to assist these students in finding what works best for them academically as well as personally. When you’re going abroad, whether for a short-term program, a semester, or an entire year, the fact remains that wherever you go, you are creating a home away from home.

Leeds City Centre

When assisting students I often use myself as an example, calling myself a city kid. Even though I grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, when I moved to the actual city in high school, I found that the vibrant, swift, and busy life of a city suited me more than slower, mellower pace of  suburban Illinois. When looking for study abroad options, I knew that living in a city would be integral for me. Like most students I’ve spoken with over the past two years, my first thought when it came to England was London. When investigating the programs in London, I discovered there weren’t any options in my price range at the time.

It required more research then, to look up what other English cities the study abroad office had programs in, and which offered classes in my major. I decided on Leeds, the third largest city in England. Of the city options, I chose Leeds because when looking through their class catalogue (“modules” instead of “classes” in the UK) I found a class that sounded interesting to me: an upper level course on the history of witchcraft in literature. In the end, it was a balanced decision between location and academics that landed me on a place I’d someday feel intense homesickness for.

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Gigantic Chess matches in the City Centre

 

 

Leeds gave me my fill of a city, but it also gave me the new experience of a walking city. In between classes and homework and day trips to different locations around the United Kingdom, I’d spend my time wandering down the cobblestoned streets of city centre; passing through the Arcades, stopping in at the (free!) museums and art galleries. As the weather grew warmer, I took the fifty minute walk from my flat to city centre instead of the ten minute bus ride, seeing rolling hills turn into the pubs, shops, and panini places that became familiar and comforting to me over the sixth months I lived there. A fifteen minute walk in the opposite direction from my flat landed me at the ruins of a monastery, towering into the sky, beautiful and stoic in its gorgeous park setting.

The ruins of Kirkstall Abbey

Kirkstall Abbey Ruins

This is not to say that life in Leeds was without its struggles, but through those struggles and those delights, I created someone confident, someone who relished the independence of exploring a museum with only herself and the art for company. I created a home away from my family and everything I knew, and discovered the power in that.

At the end of my semester, my mom came to visit for a week. Although her flight got delayed a day, and I really ought to have met her in London (where most of our week together had been planned), I insisted she come to Leeds, even just for the first afternoon. London is my favorite place in the world, it’s thrilling and beautiful on a grander scale than you can imagine, and I would love to live there someday, but Leeds was my home.

The Sticky Toffee Pudding cupcake at Cupackes by Charley in the city centre

The Sticky Toffee Pudding cupcake from Cupackes by Charley

I knew the best place to take my mom for fish and chips, I knew all the flavors at the local cupcake shop, and which ones to recommend; I knew Leeds.

I can honestly say I have only met one or two people that did not like their programs abroad. Most people feel about their cities the way I feel about Leeds, whether they picked a setting they knew they liked, or chose something that was perhaps out of their comfort zone, but an exciting challenge. I’ve heard students wax nostalgic about their host families, or excitedly recount their adventures of their host countries. Any program abroad will be a mixture of finding and creating a place for yourself in the world; but it’s a journey worth taking.

Begin your journey now! The deadline for this Winter Break programs and Spring semester programs is September 15th.

Exchange Program Spotlight: Quito, Ecuador

Guest Blogger: Zana Darwish

Located in the capital city of Ecuador, the SAO Exchange program at the Universidad San Francisco de Quito has a lot to offer students looking to study abroad. Known as the City of Eternal Spring, Quito is just south of the equator and located in an Andean valley surrounded by mountainous peaks. Otavalo Market, Pleasant Radford, ECUThe city offers a unique blend of modern practices and old world traditions. Most notably is the historical center or ‘old town,’ that is defined by its colonial splendor and indigenous character. Similarly, Quito offers a wide range of activities that appeal to all types of students. You can grab a meal in Otavalo Market, go river rafting, hike one of the surrounding mountains, or participate on a city tour.

 

The program includes four excursions that are planned for the students, giving them a chance to explore the country of Ecuador while abroad. The excursions include day trips to surrounding lakes and nature areas, a trip to the Papallacta hot springs, and a weekend trip to the pristine tropical rainforest, Puerto Quito. Transportation, housing, and meals on these excursions are already covered in the program fees, so students can travel and explore in ease.

Quilotoa Group pic

 

The program at Universidad San Francisco de Quito is direct enroll, meaning the students participating on this program can take any class available at the university. This gives University of Illinois students the opportunity to interact with other international and Ecuadorian students in their classes. A majority of the classes offered aretaught in Spanish, thus making this program a great fit for student looking to get credit for Spanish classes abroad. This program also offers unique opportunities for students to get involved volunteering within the Ecuadorian community. Volunteer projects students have participated on in the past include: environmental protection, women’s shelters, orphanages, public schools and hospitals.

service learning group, ECU

With so many unique experiences to offer students, Universidad San Francisco de Quito may be the best place for you to live, explore, and develop via cultural immersion and stimulating academia. For more information on this program go to Quito Program Page or come in a talk to a Program Assistant at the Study Abroad Office!

 

Another Summer Snack: Qubani ka Meetha

Guest Blogger: Rahul Panchal

I spent the summer as a research intern working at a diagnostics lab in Hyderabad, a bustling metropolis in Southern India. I won’t bother sharing all the work-related details here because you can find them on another specially dedicated blog I wrote to document the experience, Andhra-Style: My Life in Hyderabad. Do give it a read if you want to know more about me! I think I was able to make some pretty gritty and introspective realizations about my life at the time.

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The cramped work area where I conducted my experiments

One thing worth sharing are the contradictory emotions. While I was in Hyderabad, I was faced with a culture that was familiar, yet so alien at the same time. There were many days were I felt lonely, bored, and just wanted to fly back home.

Is it weird though now, to say that I miss almost everything about Hyderabad? I miss those rain splattered walks through work along Abid Road, through the full blown sensory assault that would greet me everyday. The incessant sound of cars, trucks, busses, and motorcycles honking their horns, the endless flow of humanity spilling onto the streets, the smell of the frying oil wafting away in the mornings from little vada and dosa stalls, the uncomfortable splashes of mucky water, swept up from roadside puddles, seeping into my shoes. I miss the lab, all cramped up in that small and windowless space,  full of the incessant chitter-chatter of my coworkers in rapid Telugu. I miss my initially feeble, but eventually triumphant attempts at speaking Hindi and trying to be more “Indian”.

Hyderabad’s Finest: the Famed Chicken Biryani at Shadaab Restaurant

For obvious reasons, I miss the food the most: waking up to an arrangement of fried goodies and peppery hot masala chai, gulab jamuns and puffy-hot pooris every Tuesday at the workplace cafeteria, spending the weekends at Lakshmi Aunty’s house, where I was reacquainted with her simple, yet heavily satisfying cuisine after so many years, and the biryani, oh, oh, oh do I miss that biryani. Juicy chunks (or legs) of chicken or mutton (goat) layered between intensely aromatic basmati rice and served with a peanut and coconut gravy known as salan, I could probably go on for posts about its uniqueness and how I will never be able to replicate this true Hyderabadi delicacy in my home. That makes me sad because most biryanis found here in the States or really anywhere outside Hyderabad for that matter, just cannot compare. What’s Andhra stays Andhra.

Fortunately, there are some Hyderabadi treats which I can prepare within the confines of my small, apartment kitchen. Best of all, this little dish is chock full of one my all time favorite snack foods, dried apricots. Where my love affair with these bright orange gems began is not hard to trace. I would go through almost a bag a day back in Denmark, for they were both cheap and a good way to hold over the hunger until the next meal. When I learned that one of Hyderabad’s trademark sweets features dried apricots as the key ingredient, it became imperative that there was going to be no way that I would be leaving the city without having bowls aplenty, all to be licked down to the last bit of golden and sticky apricot goo.

Qubani ka Meetha, which translates to “apricot-sweet” in Urdu, the language of Hyderabad’s Muslim community, is a dessert straight out of the kitchens of the Nizams (old Muslim rulers) of Hyderabad, who would have most likely sourced the dried beauties from the eastern lands of Afghanistan and Iran. Today a staple at most Hyderabadi weddings, qubani ka meetha is enjoyed by all Indians alike, but if you want a truly authentic taste, you still have to venture into the old Muslim quarter of the city, across the dried up river bank, to grab a taste at famous eateries such as Shadaab, where I was able to grab a delicious mouthful.

Qubani ka Meetha in its original splendor, how I enjoyed it in Hyderabad

Simplicity is the essence of this dish for the simplest recipes only require a boiling down of dried apricots, water, and sugar, finished with apricot kernels and a spoon of malai (clotted cream). Thus the quality and more so type of product, specifically the apricot, really factors into the final taste of this dish. In India most, if not all dried apricots, are unsulphured, meaning that they are not treated with sulfur dioxide to give them that bright orange color. They have a different taste, one that is often sweeter and more earthy. Furthermore, the pits are left in, and the utilization of the kernels within, little seeds that resemble almonds, both in terms of taste and appearance, provide the element of crunch. As sweets in India are usually only reserved for special occasions, Indian cooks typically show no restraint with the sugar, so during both instances in which I hadQubani in Hyderabad, they were cloyingly sweet, a taste that was only tempered by stirring in some of the malai. 

While I loved the Qubani ka Meetha with all its realness at Shadaab, this became one of the few dishes were I felt that I could actually make it, dare I say better, with the usage of American ingredients back home. There were naturally some big changes I had to make. Firstly, that the dried apricots we get in the US are the more familiar brightly orange-tinted Turkish varieties, which for me, have oddly enough always bursted with a fruity reminiscence of the fresh fruit. Secondly, as these apricots come without the pits, I decided to substitute this textural element by stirring in some toasted almonds. Also, as making malai usually requires long hours spent over the stove, boiling milk down and  stirring it continuously, I opted for serving with vanilla ice cream instead because as a busy and overworked college student, I ain’t got time to replicate all of my ancestral ways. The change I am the most proud of though, is the addition of crushed cardamom seeds.

A key flavor in almost all Indian desserts, cardamom is used as often in India as vanilla is in the US, but the two don’t taste anything the same, save for their floral aromas. Lusty, jammy, and full of the warm aromas of an Indian childhood (thanks to my buddy cardamom), the flavors of Qubani ka Meetha will have you missing it as soon as you finish your first bowl. Good thing, I made it again last weekend.

Recipe: Qubani ka Meetha

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dried apricots, packed
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, adjust to taste
  • 6 crushed cardamom pods, optional
  • 1/4 cup whole almonds, toasted
  • vanilla ice cream, for serving

Method:

  1. Soak the apricots in warm water overnight, till they have plumped up fully.
  2. Pour the apricots with the water (it should have a nice orange color) into a heavy bottom sauce pan with the crushed cardamom pods. Bring the mixture to a boil.
  3. Simmer the mixture for 20-25 minutes, mashing intermittently, until the apricots are softened and falling apart.
  4. Stir in the sugar and toasted almonds, cook for another 5 minutes.
  5. Serve warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream or dollop of whipped cream.

Cooking Notes:

  • If you want your Qubani to mimic both the taste and appearance of the Hyderabadi original, try using unsulphured apricots instead of the conventional Turkish kind. Also there are a good deal of Indian grocery stores that carry Indian apricots as well. These may be complete with the pits and will naturally lend you the most authentic flavor.
  • Qubani ka Meehta can also be served with a vanilla custard, creme anglaise, unsweetened whipped cream, or Greek yogurt.
  • My new favorite way to use Qubani ka Meetha is by featuring it as a cake filling. Use your favorite yellow cake recipe, place a thick layer of the Qubani between the layers, and frost with a cardamom whipped cream. It is guaranteed to blow the minds of your guests. It sure did for mine :)!

Find more of Rahul’s recipes and stories at his blog, Cooking Fever

 

From Peer Advisors to Program Assistants

Guest Blogger: Kaitlin Kuhl

As we head into the 2014-2015 academic year, the Study Abroad Office is seeing a multitude of changes. With the goal set to send more students abroad in the future, current staff have been working on ways to reinvent the study abroad message and its outlook. One of the biggest changes the office is undergoing is replacing the Peer Advisors with Program Assistants. As the Study Abroad Office looks to hire recent study abroad returnees to fill the former Peer Advisor position, the office has taken the initiative to give these students more responsibility and sponsorship for the hard work they demonstrate in the office; thus, we are changing the job title from Peer Advisor to Program Assistant.

Program Assistants work to find a program that fits for students and guide them through their application process

For those who don’t know who Peer Advisors are, these students are the front line for those who want to go on a study abroad program. Although Peer Advisors facilitate outreach events and aid the office with general day-to-day operations, often times Illinois students visit the Resource Room in the Study Abroad Office in order to talk to a Peer Advisor about where they should study abroad. Peer Advisors are knowledgeable on the range of programs offered by the Study Abroad Office and can assist students with finding a program that meets their academic, personal and professional needs. When assisting students, Peer Advisors must also be sensitive to a student’s financial means, academic standing and personal limitations. As Peer Advisors, we lead the student through the process of choosing a program and aid them in applying. Peer Advisors are often the ones who help students in the post-acceptance process as well. Whether it is the course approval process or filling out the host institution application, Peer Advisors are knowledgeable on everything that must be completed in order to participate on a study abroad program.

So then, why the name change from Peer Advisor to Program Assistant? The Study Abroad Office wants to recognize the work that the Peer Advisors do and complement their knowledge. It is because of their work that students are able to go abroad. Although area advisors deal with institutions and partners abroad, broker agreements and manage student applications, Peer Advisors are the ones who are able to get students to apply when they might have thought that study abroad was out of the question. As a team within the Study Abroad Office, Peer Advisors hold and share the most knowledge on the options available and the process that needs to be followed in order to study abroad.

It is the Peer Advisors who are able to assist students to find

a program that meets their academic, financial and personal needs. Without Peer Advisors, most students wouldn’t know how to even

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begin looking for a program. With that said, it is time that the office recognizes the Peer Advisors as more than just study abroad returnees who aid students with the study abroad process because it is the Peer Advisors who truly keep study abroad alive.The new Program Assistants will be distinguished for their incredible knowledge on all the programs available, their work with office operations including facilitating with applications, and will aid in joining the campus-wide goal to send twice as many students abroad in years to come.

Come meet the new Program Assistants this Fall semester to get help finding the right program for you!

A True Red Gem: Rødgrød med Fløde

Guest Blogger: Rahul Panchal

After a lot of waiting and crying over blisteringly cold days, springtime has finally come to Denmark. The sun is out almost everyday, the weather is brisk, yet pleasant enough to walk around without a jacket, and Copenhageners have finally stepped out to reclaim their streets. Perhaps the best part of this new season would have to be the large amounts of Danish-grown produce that is slowly arriving in the markets. Just last week, while strolling though the city center, I saw little cartons of ruby-red strawberries, the packaging proudly proclaiming, “dansk jordbær” (Danish strawberries). Excited to say the least, I immediately caved in and shelled out 25 kroner (about 4.50 dollars) for the little half-pound box. Yes, they may have only been like 12 DSCN9563little strawberries in total, but each of them was full of magnificent and richly concentrated strawberry flavor that balanced perfectly between the dimensions of sweet and sour. It got me thinking ahead far into the Danish summertime.

Because the summertime is so short in Scandinavia, people all over the region, including Denmark, savor it to the fullest. Festivals are built around the climate and the sun, particularly in the northernmost reaches of Sweden of Norway, where special parties are thrown to celebrate “midnight sun”, a phenomenon where the sun shines for almost the entire day. Even here in Copenhagen, the sun only sets around 9 pm now, it’s crazy!

DSCN9573It has been built into the mentality of Danish cuisine to only savor certain ingredients when they are at their best, and actually, I think that the same can be said for almost every cuisine. Rødgrød med Fløde is a celebration of the Danish summertime harvest. Translating to “red porridge with cream”, Rødgrød med Fløde traditionally consists of a mixture of red and black currants, strawberries, and raspberries that are simmered down with sugar and water and then thickened with a couple of spoons of potato flour. The resulting “pudding” is then served chilled with a splashing of ice-cold DSCN9617cream on top. That’s right, just pure, unsweetened, unwhipped, and unadulterated cream. The simplicity of everything is   beautiful. The milky cream puts to sleep the tangy chattering of the berries. The contrast is utterly refreshing while still maintaining a measure of substance in your stomach due to the starch in the recipe.

Because currants are not available at all in Denmark until June/July, I used a mixture of strawberries, raspberries, andDSCN9571rhubarb in this recipe. Even though it it’s not a berry, rhubarb is often a traditional ingredient in many rødgrød med fløde recipes. Furthermore, it kind of also has become one of my favorite fruits at the moment, and the pairing of strawberries and rhubarb is not only symbolic and eternal, it’s a match made in heaven.

So, when summer finally hits your homes, take to the kitchens with some Danish inspiration and try cooking up some Rødgrød med Fløde. Sure, it may be a workout to pronounce, but it certainly isn’t a workout to make.

DSCN9625Recipe: Rødgrød med Fløde

Adapted slightly from this recipe found on the blog,  My Danish Kitchen

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound fresh strawberries, hulled and chopped in half
  • 2 stalks rhubarb, cut into 1-2 inch pieces
  • 1/3 pound raspberries
  • 3/4 cups sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons potato flour or cornstarch
  • heavy cream, for serving

Method:

Wash all the fruit and then cut up the rhubarb and strawberries. Place the fruit in a large pot with the sugar and water. DSCN9583Simmer over medium-low heat for about 15 minutes, until the fruit has fallen apart and is tender. Pass the fruit through a sieve to separate out the seeds, but keep the pulp! Return the juices and pulp to the pot. Stir the potato flour with some water to dissolve and make a slurry mixture. Bring the fruit juices and pulp back to a simmer and then stir in the dissolved potato flour in increments. Keep letting the mixture simmer until it has thickened enough to coat the back of a spoon, similar to what would DSCN9590happen if you were to be making a custard or a pudding.

Pour the rødgrød into a bowl and allow it to cool in the fridge until completely chilled, about 4 hours to overnight. Serve in shallow plates or bowls with a splashing of ice cold cream on top.

Cooking Notes:

  • There is not a ton of sugar in this recipe, but the idea is that you will be using ripe fruit, and rødgrød is not supposed to be that sweet anyway.
  • If you are not into cream, you can also serve Rødgrød med Fløde with milk or even a spoon of greek yoghurt or cottage cheese.
  • For people with a massive sweet tooth, rødgrød can also be used as a topping over vanilla ice cream.

Find more recipe’s at Rahul’s blog, Cooking Fever!

cookingfever

DSCN9560After a lot of waiting and crying over blisteringly cold days, springtime has finally come to Denmark. The sun is out almost everyday, the weather is brisk, yet pleasant enough to walk around without a jacket, and Copenhageners have finally stepped out to reclaim their streets. Perhaps the best part of this new season would have to be the large amounts of Danish-grown produce that is slowly arriving in the markets. Just last week, while strolling though the city center, I saw little cartons of ruby-red strawberries, the packaging proudly proclaiming, “dansk jordbær” (Danish strawberries). Excited to say the least, I immediately caved in and shelled out 25 kroner (about 4.50 dollars) for the little half-pound box. Yes, they may have only been like 12 DSCN9563little strawberries in total, but each of them was full of magnificent and richly concentrated strawberry flavor that balanced perfectly between the dimensions of…

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Excursion Abroad: The Gower and Worm Head

Excerpt from the Blog of: Lindsey Watts

Studied Abroad: Swansea, Wales

This past weekend I explored the other famous part of this city called the Gower Peninsula. It has just been rated the 10th best beach  in the world and number 1 in the UK. Naturally, I was going to have to go check it out. I got a few of my friends  together and went for a Saturday afternoon. We were lucky because there was 0% chance of rain

Watts 2

and though there were some cloudy skies and it was very cold, it was still a great day for an adventure. We got on the bus for free(!) and went to Rhossili which is a very small village in the Gower. The village is comprised of a church, a hotel, a few shops and that is it. The village is very cutewith all of the buildings made of stone. However, the village only takes about 10 min to look at. The real attraction is what surrounds it. Looking around for miles, as far as you can see, is beautiful landscape. A view that words can simply not express. I was standing on a piece of land that stopped at the ocean before me, creating stony cliffs, covered in bright green grass and Watts 4topped with hundreds of sheep.  Yes, I said it. There were hundreds of sheep both wild and owned living on the same land. They would be about 6ft away from us and then run away.

The Gower is composed of many cliffs and an island called Worm’s Head. There is a rocky sea floor tureen that bridges the cliffs’ main land to the island. Many people go across and hike on the island and then come back. However, you must be careful because when the tide comes in the water goes over the rocky bridge and you can be stranded on the island until the tide goes back out. The good news is that there is a small building at the end of the main land where some cute old men volunteer as a coast guard and watch out for those who go over. By the time we made it to the edge of the main land we only had an hour until the tide would be there. Most of us thought that we did not have time to go across and come back, though my friend, Paul, decided to go for it and ended up having to half run there and back. He said he had a great time though and would love to go back and do it when he had more time. I also would like to do that when my parents come and I take them there.Watts 9

After adventuring around (me climbing down a little bit off the cliff) and Paul finding some caves, we went to the small hotel and had a nice small meal. I had a nice lentil and vegetable soup with some bread and a side of chips (steak fries).  Watts 8We then looked in a couple of the gift stores they have and then hopped on the bus back by 2:30pm. Before we left we also got a glimpse of a very old church that had graves from the 1800s and some that were from just 20 years ago. I am sure it would be super spooky during Halloween, but it was pretty cool just to see.