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The Wonderful World of the “Untranslatable”

Guest Blogger: Lindsay Anderson, Senior Program Assistant at the Study Abroad Office, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Have you ever had a feeling or felt an emotion that, when asked to describe it, you couldn’t find a single word in your own language to explain it? Does an action or feeling trigger a memory or a funny/cute/interesting stream of consciousness in your mind? Well you are not alone! In fact, this phenomenon of “untranslatability” is quite common across all cultures. Here are a few intriguing examples of feelings, emotions, actions, and situations that are deemed “untranslatable” from around the world. See if you can think of any others!

                              GERMAN                                                                                    JAPANESE 

found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-4

               found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-5

                          SWEDISH                                                                            RUKWANGALI (Bantu Language)

                                          found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-9found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-11

                            KOREAN                                                                                 INUIT (American Indian)

                                          found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-23found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-24

      TSHILUBA (Bantu Language)                                                                           YAGAN (Indigenous Australians)

                                                  found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-25found-in-translation-untranslatable-words-illustrations-anjana-iyer-30

 

Photo Credit for the Above Photos: http://www.boredpanda.com/untranslatable-words-found-in-translation-anjana-iyer/


SPANISH                                                                                    YIDDISH

cute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurinacute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurina-3

Charming-Series-of-Illustrations-Depict-What-Words-Fail-to-Capture2__880

Photo Credit for the Above Photos: http://www.boredpanda.com/cute-illustrations-untranslatable-words-marija-tiurina/

PORTUGUESE

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Photo Credit: http://piccsy.com/2013/11/photo-131ce81c5

Plan for a Life of Travel: Explorers Travel Program for Alumni

Guest Blogger: Alissa Dappas

After studying abroad or spending any time overseas, it’s safe to say that most travelers come back home itching topack up once again and head out for another adventure.  I know this is certainly my situation.  I have now been back in the United States for nearly a year, and I daydream constantly of the next places I want to visit and explore.

Sorrento-LemonFarm_98548f0c606a_300dpi Although I (like most people) desire to travel again, it has become apparent that planning an overseas educational trip in an organized and well-budgeted way is easier said than done.  With graduation approaching and no time left to study abroad for a second time, I thought my chances to travel in an educational type setting were long gone.  Fortunately, I’ve recently learned about an opportunity for University of Illinois alumni that allows you to travel with fellow Illinois graduates, and like study abroad, learn something about the places you travel to. Through the University of Illinois Alumni Association Explorers Travel Program, you can relive aspects of your study abroad experience in new locations, or for those of you have not studied abroad before, now is your chance to take your Illini pride overseas!

See What you can cook up, traveling with fellow alumns

See What you can cook up, traveling with fellow alumni

As the graduation date approaches, I’m sure most seniors are constantly being asked, “So what’s next?” As terrifying as this question may be, there are different ways to go about giving an answer. Of course, the expected answers explain a summary of an upcoming job placement or potentially attending graduate school. As exciting as these things may be, don’t forget to talk about grander plans. IMG_0298-1What else will you do with your life post college years? Travel, perhaps? As an Illinois graduate, the Explorers alumni tour program is perfect for you! There is no certain age to participate, you can convince your friends to go with you while meeting fellow University of Illiniois alumni, the planning is done for you and prices are very reasonable. With diverse location options (Europe, Asia, Africa and more!), programs that offer educational components (recommended reading lists, guest lectures, professional tour guides, etc.), and comfortable stays in 4-5 star hotels, it will feel like an adult version of studying abroad. With 50-60 trips a year, there is something for everyone. Listed below are just a few examples of some upcoming travels! For more information, please visit http://www.uiaa.org/explorers/.

  • Croatia’s Adriatic Coast

o   Educational themes: Contemporary Croatia, Seafaring History, and Epicurean Croatia o   Dates: June 2nd-14th o   Cost: starting at $3,695

  • Ireland

o   Educational themes: Irish music and Dance, the history of Ireland and County Clare, Irish Seanchai, and Finding Your Irish Roots o   Dates: June 22nd-July 2nd o   Cost: starting at $3,295

  • Paris Immersion Program

o   Educational themes: Paris and its art, architecture, culture, cuisine, and history o   Dates: August 20th-September 4th o   Cost: starting at $3,995

  • Undiscovered Apulia, Italy

o   Educational themes: Italy’s Deep South, Lecce and Ostuni’s Architectural History, and Italy and Apulia today o   Dates: September 23rd-October 1st o   Cost: starting at $2,395

  • Machu Picchu

o   Educational themes: History and traditions of the Peruvian Andes, from Cusco to the Sacred Valley, and finally Machu Picchu o   Dates: November 1st-6th o   Cost: starting at $2,995

 

Journaling versus Blogging: What’s the best way for you to document your experience abroad?

Guest Blogger: Zana Darwish

Immediately after my acceptance to the Lincoln University program in Christchurch, New Zealand I began thinking about how I wanted to document my experience. I would of course, like a true millennial, bring a camera along to capture endless amounts of pictures, but I also wanted a median of documentation that would record my feelings, actions, and thoughts while traveling. This lead me to the often-used options of blogging and journaling as means to chronicle my experience with words as opposed to just images. After looking more into both options, I couldn’t figure out which one was for me so I, again as true millennial, decided to not decide and used both formats to document my time abroad. What I found was that each median has its own perks and drawbacks.

 

Blogging

Based on almost no evidence, I think this is the more popular of the two options for students participating on programs abroad and it’s easy to see why. Blogs are easy to start, easy to maintain, and can be shared with loved ones back home who are eager to read about your excursions (I’m looking at you, Moms). I used the popular website Weebly to create my blog page and shared the URL with anyone who would be even vaguely interested in reading about what I was doing in New Zealand. What I really liked about blogging was the writing part, surprisingly enough. It became a fun way to relive and recap my weekend for friends and family at home, and for my future self. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gone through my blog and read it again after returning home to the States. It perfectly captured my inner voice at that time in my life and in hindsight, I’m really happy to have those stories written at the time I was experiencing them. Plus, blogging is something you can put on your resume! Employers like seeing that you have experience with maintaining and writing via social media as it is becoming widely used by all types of businesses.

Incase you’re interested in starting your own study abroad blog here are some websites to check out!

  1. weebly.com
  2. wordpress.com
  3. medium.com

 

Journaling

Based on even less evidence, I think journaling is the long lost cousin of blogging that students tend to forget about as way to document their study abroad program. Although similar, keeping a journal can be an entirely different experience than blogging. I found this was the case mainly because blogs are written for other people to read and enjoy, while journals are usually kept private. Interestingly enough, I also found that I struggled with writing in a journal upon first starting. I approached it in the same manner I did my blog− writing about events and stories− but found that journals are better for documenting reactions and feelings that are typically omitted in blogs. With the sensor removed, my journal shows the personal transformation I underwent while abroad. The things my journaling focused on at the beginning of the program versus the end reflect the way studying abroad completely changed what I valued and therefore, wrote about. Plus, journaling at a cafe in a foreign country is exactly as romantic as it sounds and it’s fun to play up the stereotype of being a traveler every once in a while.

 

Overall, I enjoyed writing for each of these formats for different reasons and they will both be appreciated by my nostalgistic self for quite sometime. However, if I had to choose one to recommend to future study abroad-ers it would be journaling. The experience of studying abroad is inherently selfish: exploring the world as a student inevitably results in a journey of self-discovery. With every culture you are exposed to while traveling, you learn a little bit more about the world but, in turn, you learn so much more about yourself. And after using both methods, I believe journaling is the most effective way to document the personal growth students’ experience while abroad.

Reflection Before Graduation: What To Take From Study Abroad

Guest Blogger: Kenzie Pittman

With my Graduation nearing, I can’t help to think back at each semester as a student at U of I. One semester in particular that comes to mind is the Fall that I spent studying in Verona, Italy. Before my study abroad trip, I had never been out of the country. It was definitely scary, and was going to be a challenge taking, on a new language and culture in Italy.

What I wanted out of my study abroad experience, however, was a challenge. I wanted to try a new language, and expose myself to a totally new culture, and Italy was a beautiful place to do so. I remember being out in Verona practicing my Italian to the best of my ability. It was tough at times, but it made my learning experience that much better. I wanted to learn more about their culture, art, history, and that’s what the classes in my program provided me with. I took Italian, Art History, Painting, and Photography. The curriculum was a lot different than what I was used to at U of I. I hadn’t taken a painting or art class since I was in middle school, but I learned so much from my amazing instructors in all of my different classes. They were so qualified and so passionate about what they did, and it made me excited to be in class every single day. It was such a hands-on learning experience, because not only did we get to learn in the classroom, we got to learn out in the city of Verona and in other cities nearby. We would actually get to see the things we were learning about. The classes I took really opened up my eyes to the arts and my appreciation for them. There is so much history and beautiful architecture in Italy, and it was totally new information to learn and take in.


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As I look back, I cherish my time in Verona for many reasons, in addition to my classroom experiences. The challenges I faced made me stronger, and the people I met made my experience wonderful. My broader view of Italian culture and a completely new country was exhilarating, and I promised myself to cherish every day there. Since then, I stick to that motto even back on campus, and as a soon-to-be graduate. One of the greatest things I noticed while in Italy is that they live their lives with such happiness. They appreciate their friends and socialize for hours, just loving the company of their loved ones. My experience in Verona taught me to do that, and for that I am grateful. I was so fortunate to have the opportunity to live in Verona for a semester. That happiness doesn’t have to leave your study abroad experience.

It can be taken back with you and practiced in your everyday life.
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So as you think about studying abroad and what you want out of it, remember to not let it pass you by. Cherish every day, and take every day as an exciting learning experience.

Appreciate the company and the culture around you, and you will come back with the most rewarding experience of your life.

 

Overcoming Reverse Culture Shock

Guest Blogger: Ruchi Tekriwal Before applying for a study abroad program, I researched every option and picked the one that best suited my needs. Before arriving to my host institution, I read everything from books to blogs about Morocco to get a basic understanding of the culture. While I was abroad, I enrolled in multiple language classes to better communicate with my host family, of which no member spoke English. Along every step of the way, I was reasonably prepared and I knew what to expect. What I was not prepared for was coming back home. The first few weeks after returning from abroad, I was hopelessly nostalgic. Every little thing reminded me of my time abroad, the friends I had made there, and the strangers that had come to be my family. I didn’t know that a semester apart would create a distance between me and my friends. I didn’t know that Arabic classes would no longer be as fulfilling. And I didn’t know that from that point on, I’d have a permanent itch to return abroad, to the Middle East, to speak a language other than English on a daily basis. Of course I planned to return abroad after graduation, to study Arabic in the Middle East and maybe even work there…but that didn’t help with the three semesters I had left to graduate. Three long semesters, during which I was filled with a longing to somehow reconnect with my time abroad. Image When I returned from abroad, I applied to be a Peer Advisor in the campus Study Abroad Office. I liked the idea of being constantly surrounded by study abroad talk and the chance to mentor students before their term abroad. More than a year after returning from abroad and in my third semester of working at the Study Abroad Office, I can say that this was undoubtedly the best decision I could have made. Through this position, I have been able to revisit my experiences abroad and constantly reflect on them and interpret them. Although studying abroad is very important, realizing and analyzing its effect on yourself is just as important. Because I am in constant contact with the study abroad process, I am always rethinking my opinions about my own experience and challenging my original conclusions. One year and two and a half months after leaving Morocco, I am still learning from it. I can’t imagine an experience more powerful than that. If you have returned from studying abroad, or will have in a few months,

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I encourage you to think about what your feelings will be and how you will cope with them. Whether you apply to be a peer advisor, join International Illini, or continue on your own, make sure you take the time to reflect on your experiences abroad, how they changed you, and how they will effect you in the future.

How Strangers Become Family: Cross-Cultural Connection

Guest Blogger: Alissa Dappas

When it comes to learning a new language, there is only so much a student can get out of lectures and exams.  To truly become proficient, conversation practice is essential.  As a Spanish minor, I knew that my study abroad experience had to include as much language immersion as possible if I ever wanted to become a confident Spanish speaker.  To achieve maximum language immersion, I decided to attend the study abroad program in San Joaquin de Flores, Costa Rica because of its approved Illinois Spanish-credit classes and most importantly, because all students in the program had to live with a host family.  Although I was extremely nervous about the concept of moving in with strangers for four months, I now consider my relationship with my host family to be the most rewarding aspect of my semester in Costa Rica.

Throughout my time spent abroad, my host family was my strongest and always-available support system.  No matter what the situation or question, they were the people I turned to for help or guidance.  I was lucky to live with a very caring host mom, Patricia, host dad, Ronald, and two younger host sisters, Diana and Priscila.  Each member of my family took time to get to know me personally and as the semester went on, I began to realize that I really did consider them to be part of my own family.  There was never one specific moment that made me come to this realization; I think it was simply a bunch of small things that built on top of each other.  For instance, my host mom and I were normally the only ones around for breakfast, so every morning, I would begin my day by having a conversation with her while helping prepare the food, eating or cleaning the dishes. hostfam1 When my host sisters came back from school, we would play cards together or I would teach them how to do cartwheels in the backyard.  We often bonded by talking about things we had in common (a mutual Harry Potter obsession was a hot topic) and laughing at my funny pronunciations of some words.  After dinner, my host dad was my go-to person when I wanted to learn more about the Costa Rican government or general Latin American politics.  He always seemed to know a bit about both sides of any story and usually knew more about the events or debates going on in the United States than I knew myself.  So within this one family unit, I came to know each person as an individual and because of this, I learned more than I ever previously imagined I would.  Besides being able to practice my Spanish with a group of people I was comfortable with, I was also able to create lifelong bonds and gain family members that belong to a culture different from my own.

host fam            Looking back, all four months with my Costa Rican family summed up to one huge lesson on the importance of time spent together as a family.  Culturally, this is where I saw the greatest difference between the United States and Costa Rica.  Although many people would argue that the idea of a strong family unit is still very important to most Americans, it would be hard to deny that the family dynamic in the United States is not influenced by parents’ work schedules, sports practices, tutoring, videogames, fast food dinners, etc.  In Costa Rica, time spent together comes before most other obligations.  And from what I’ve heard and read, it seems like this importance on family time is a central part of Latin American culture as a whole, and not just in Costa Rica.  No matter my host parents’ schedules, they always made time each day to make a meal together and sit down as a family for dinner.  Most days, the dinner was usually followed by a game played together or a conversation that carried over from the main meal to dessert or coffee.  host sisterIt was during these dinners and late-night conversations that we would discuss our days, hear about any problems my sisters were having at school or learn news about the extended family (who happened to live in all of the surrounding houses).  During these moments, I learned more about life and the values of Costa Ricans and my family was able to learn about my life in the United States.

Slowly but surely, my new family impacted me in such a way that I now actively try to apply their family-centered, peaceful mentalities to my own life back in the United States.  Not only did my Spanish conversation ability improve, but living with a host family also reopened my eyes to the more important things in life and that above all, the relationships that we have with our friends and family should come before everything else.

Technology Abroad: Put Down the Phone and Live!

Guest Blogger: Kenzie Pittman

I left for my semester abroad to Verona, Italy with my iPhone, but with no intention of using it.  I had no particular plan set up to make it cheaper to use, I simply turned off my data so as not to be charged and that was that.  I had it with me for the sole purpose of music, occasional photos, and in case of emergency on my flight to Europe.  I have friends who went abroad after me, and asked for my advice on what plan to get while abroad or what to do about their IPhone.  I simply suggested not to use it, to embrace what is around you, and to connect with people from home only on your laptop in the comfort of your residence abroad.

Technology is a key part of our society today; most of us use it daily.  Between texting on our iPhones, our social media accounts, email, etc. we are all engaged in our devices daily. But while abroad, I think this constant use needs to change.

I’ve seen many people study abroad since I have returned.  I have scrolled through countless Instagram photos, tweets, and Facebook posts. which are most likely from an iPhone.  I am not going to post about what people are doing wrong here; instead, I am going to post about what I did and what worked for me.

421600_10152090482680237_919353786_nI had an Italian phone that was ‘pay as you go’ and just a tiny little flip phone.  I had an Italian number, and the contact information of my resident director as well as the other girls in my program.  We were able to fill it with Euro and text each other, call each other, and for general safety.  This was all the contact I needed while out and about in Verona, or traveling.  My iPhone was left at home, so that I wouldn’t lose it and so that I didn’t use it.  There was really no need for it.  I found myself so engaged in my surroundings and truly appreciating what I was taking in around me.  Studying abroad is a once in a lifetime opportunity, why do I need to spend it on my Instagram looking to see how many likes I got on a picture of the Eiffel Tower?  People who study abroad are clearly leading a more interesting life than those in Champaign. They know that, you know that.  Instagram and social media accounts are not meant to be looked at daily when you are supposed to be having the time of your life.  The only time I was on my Facebook, etc. was when I was sitting in my apartment not doing anything.  That’s the time when you want to connect to friends, family, and even post your pictures to Facebook from your camera.  I did that, in addition to occasionally tweeting, but I didn’t ever do it unless I was in my apartment.  This made sure that I wasn’t focused on anything else but taking in my surroundings while I was exploring during my time abroad.  Yes, I wanted to show people my pictures so they could see what I was doing and for my own records.  But there is no need to do this on your phone while walking around.

Posting to social media and being engaged in your phone is definitely part of our society.  But when you go abroad, change that.  It’s liberating to actually just soak it all in, without showing anyone at the moment.  Then, when you get back to your apartment, host family, or dorm, you can show them to the people you cohabitate with!  It’s just all about enjoying what you’re doing at the time.  Social media, our iPhones, etc. distract us from what’s around us.  Studying abroad is the perfect opportunity to put the iPhone down and truly engage in your experience.